Tons of new books in the Wow Cool | Alternative Comics shop this week, including many SPX debuts. http://WowCool.com

Reid Psaltis’ Kingdom/Order is now available in our shop.

Reid Psaltis stopped by with his sketchbook today.

Got a big stack of bandes dessinees at my neighbors garage sale.

comixology:

A comiXologist Recommends:Harris Smith recommends At the Shore #2
As goofy and loveable as the gang from Scooby-Doo , the central group of misfits in Jim Campbell’s At the Shore #2, from Alternative Comics, finds themselves embroiled in a mystery when their car is stuck on the beach.  Bickering the whole time, they face off against what may or may not be oceanic zombies, which may or may not be the result of the environmental shenanigans of the Midlothian Seaweed Mining Company.  The story unfolds among flashbacks that may or may not be relevant to the story (I’m betting they are) as the characters bicker their way through this ever-evolving adventure.
At the Shore has its own unique sense of style that sets it apart from many of the other zombie comics out there these days.  It’s certainly a horror story in the grand tradition of “teens stranded somewhere” horror stories, but it’s funny too, yet the humor isn’t overly jokey.  Rather, it arises subtly from the relationships between the characters and their dialogue.  Campbell seems to be referencing young adult mysteries, a la Nancy Drew, the Hardy Boys and the aforementioned Scooby-Doo, yet he’s not afraid to throw in a good zombie head-squashing, suggesting the possibility that things could take a significantly darker turn as the story progresses.  It’s appropriate his art somewhat recalls that of Richard Sala, who operates in a similar arena of humor and horror.  There’s a hint of Bryan Lee O’Malley in there too, as I think fans of Scott Pilgrim and Lost at Sea would feel at home in the world of At the Shore.
The resulting mesh of conflicting tones and genre bending is delightfully unpredictable and off-kilter, and makes me a really fun read.  Without being overly saccharine or excessively twee, At the Shore is, without a doubt, the most charming zombie comic on the market today.  It’s rewarding read for those of us who enjoy low-key humor and oddball horror.
[Read At the Shore #2 on comiXology]
Harris Smith is a Brooklyn-based comics and media professional. In addition to his role as a Senior Production Coordinator at comiXology, he edits several comics anthologies, including Jeans and Felony Comics, under the banner of Negative Pleasure Publications. He’s also the host of the weekly radio show Neagtive Pleasure on Newtown Radio.
comixology:

A comiXologist Recommends:Harris Smith recommends At the Shore #2
As goofy and loveable as the gang from Scooby-Doo , the central group of misfits in Jim Campbell’s At the Shore #2, from Alternative Comics, finds themselves embroiled in a mystery when their car is stuck on the beach.  Bickering the whole time, they face off against what may or may not be oceanic zombies, which may or may not be the result of the environmental shenanigans of the Midlothian Seaweed Mining Company.  The story unfolds among flashbacks that may or may not be relevant to the story (I’m betting they are) as the characters bicker their way through this ever-evolving adventure.
At the Shore has its own unique sense of style that sets it apart from many of the other zombie comics out there these days.  It’s certainly a horror story in the grand tradition of “teens stranded somewhere” horror stories, but it’s funny too, yet the humor isn’t overly jokey.  Rather, it arises subtly from the relationships between the characters and their dialogue.  Campbell seems to be referencing young adult mysteries, a la Nancy Drew, the Hardy Boys and the aforementioned Scooby-Doo, yet he’s not afraid to throw in a good zombie head-squashing, suggesting the possibility that things could take a significantly darker turn as the story progresses.  It’s appropriate his art somewhat recalls that of Richard Sala, who operates in a similar arena of humor and horror.  There’s a hint of Bryan Lee O’Malley in there too, as I think fans of Scott Pilgrim and Lost at Sea would feel at home in the world of At the Shore.
The resulting mesh of conflicting tones and genre bending is delightfully unpredictable and off-kilter, and makes me a really fun read.  Without being overly saccharine or excessively twee, At the Shore is, without a doubt, the most charming zombie comic on the market today.  It’s rewarding read for those of us who enjoy low-key humor and oddball horror.
[Read At the Shore #2 on comiXology]
Harris Smith is a Brooklyn-based comics and media professional. In addition to his role as a Senior Production Coordinator at comiXology, he edits several comics anthologies, including Jeans and Felony Comics, under the banner of Negative Pleasure Publications. He’s also the host of the weekly radio show Neagtive Pleasure on Newtown Radio.
comixology:

A comiXologist Recommends:Harris Smith recommends At the Shore #2
As goofy and loveable as the gang from Scooby-Doo , the central group of misfits in Jim Campbell’s At the Shore #2, from Alternative Comics, finds themselves embroiled in a mystery when their car is stuck on the beach.  Bickering the whole time, they face off against what may or may not be oceanic zombies, which may or may not be the result of the environmental shenanigans of the Midlothian Seaweed Mining Company.  The story unfolds among flashbacks that may or may not be relevant to the story (I’m betting they are) as the characters bicker their way through this ever-evolving adventure.
At the Shore has its own unique sense of style that sets it apart from many of the other zombie comics out there these days.  It’s certainly a horror story in the grand tradition of “teens stranded somewhere” horror stories, but it’s funny too, yet the humor isn’t overly jokey.  Rather, it arises subtly from the relationships between the characters and their dialogue.  Campbell seems to be referencing young adult mysteries, a la Nancy Drew, the Hardy Boys and the aforementioned Scooby-Doo, yet he’s not afraid to throw in a good zombie head-squashing, suggesting the possibility that things could take a significantly darker turn as the story progresses.  It’s appropriate his art somewhat recalls that of Richard Sala, who operates in a similar arena of humor and horror.  There’s a hint of Bryan Lee O’Malley in there too, as I think fans of Scott Pilgrim and Lost at Sea would feel at home in the world of At the Shore.
The resulting mesh of conflicting tones and genre bending is delightfully unpredictable and off-kilter, and makes me a really fun read.  Without being overly saccharine or excessively twee, At the Shore is, without a doubt, the most charming zombie comic on the market today.  It’s rewarding read for those of us who enjoy low-key humor and oddball horror.
[Read At the Shore #2 on comiXology]
Harris Smith is a Brooklyn-based comics and media professional. In addition to his role as a Senior Production Coordinator at comiXology, he edits several comics anthologies, including Jeans and Felony Comics, under the banner of Negative Pleasure Publications. He’s also the host of the weekly radio show Neagtive Pleasure on Newtown Radio.
comixology:

A comiXologist Recommends:Harris Smith recommends At the Shore #2
As goofy and loveable as the gang from Scooby-Doo , the central group of misfits in Jim Campbell’s At the Shore #2, from Alternative Comics, finds themselves embroiled in a mystery when their car is stuck on the beach.  Bickering the whole time, they face off against what may or may not be oceanic zombies, which may or may not be the result of the environmental shenanigans of the Midlothian Seaweed Mining Company.  The story unfolds among flashbacks that may or may not be relevant to the story (I’m betting they are) as the characters bicker their way through this ever-evolving adventure.
At the Shore has its own unique sense of style that sets it apart from many of the other zombie comics out there these days.  It’s certainly a horror story in the grand tradition of “teens stranded somewhere” horror stories, but it’s funny too, yet the humor isn’t overly jokey.  Rather, it arises subtly from the relationships between the characters and their dialogue.  Campbell seems to be referencing young adult mysteries, a la Nancy Drew, the Hardy Boys and the aforementioned Scooby-Doo, yet he’s not afraid to throw in a good zombie head-squashing, suggesting the possibility that things could take a significantly darker turn as the story progresses.  It’s appropriate his art somewhat recalls that of Richard Sala, who operates in a similar arena of humor and horror.  There’s a hint of Bryan Lee O’Malley in there too, as I think fans of Scott Pilgrim and Lost at Sea would feel at home in the world of At the Shore.
The resulting mesh of conflicting tones and genre bending is delightfully unpredictable and off-kilter, and makes me a really fun read.  Without being overly saccharine or excessively twee, At the Shore is, without a doubt, the most charming zombie comic on the market today.  It’s rewarding read for those of us who enjoy low-key humor and oddball horror.
[Read At the Shore #2 on comiXology]
Harris Smith is a Brooklyn-based comics and media professional. In addition to his role as a Senior Production Coordinator at comiXology, he edits several comics anthologies, including Jeans and Felony Comics, under the banner of Negative Pleasure Publications. He’s also the host of the weekly radio show Neagtive Pleasure on Newtown Radio.

comixology:

A comiXologist Recommends:
Harris Smith recommends At the Shore #2

As goofy and loveable as the gang from Scooby-Doo , the central group of misfits in Jim Campbell’s At the Shore #2, from Alternative Comics, finds themselves embroiled in a mystery when their car is stuck on the beach.  Bickering the whole time, they face off against what may or may not be oceanic zombies, which may or may not be the result of the environmental shenanigans of the Midlothian Seaweed Mining Company.  The story unfolds among flashbacks that may or may not be relevant to the story (I’m betting they are) as the characters bicker their way through this ever-evolving adventure.

At the Shore has its own unique sense of style that sets it apart from many of the other zombie comics out there these days.  It’s certainly a horror story in the grand tradition of “teens stranded somewhere” horror stories, but it’s funny too, yet the humor isn’t overly jokey.  Rather, it arises subtly from the relationships between the characters and their dialogue.  Campbell seems to be referencing young adult mysteries, a la Nancy Drew, the Hardy Boys and the aforementioned Scooby-Doo, yet he’s not afraid to throw in a good zombie head-squashing, suggesting the possibility that things could take a significantly darker turn as the story progresses.  It’s appropriate his art somewhat recalls that of Richard Sala, who operates in a similar arena of humor and horror.  There’s a hint of Bryan Lee O’Malley in there too, as I think fans of Scott Pilgrim and Lost at Sea would feel at home in the world of At the Shore.

The resulting mesh of conflicting tones and genre bending is delightfully unpredictable and off-kilter, and makes me a really fun read.  Without being overly saccharine or excessively twee, At the Shore is, without a doubt, the most charming zombie comic on the market today.  It’s rewarding read for those of us who enjoy low-key humor and oddball horror.

[Read At the Shore #2 on comiXology]

Harris Smith is a Brooklyn-based comics and media professional. In addition to his role as a Senior Production Coordinator at comiXology, he edits several comics anthologies, including Jeans and Felony Comics, under the banner of Negative Pleasure Publications. He’s also the host of the weekly radio show Neagtive Pleasure on Newtown Radio.

Alternative Comics and Revival House Press are at SPX table i7

Get your copy from Alternative Comics and Derf at SPX 2014, 2 months before it hits stores!
smallpresspreviews:

True Stories Volume One
by Derf Backderf
published by Alternative Comics
Derf – creator of the graphic novels Trashed, Punk Rock & Trailer Parks and the international bestseller, My Friend Dahmer – presents the best of his True Stories from the long running The City comic strip, as seen in Best American Comics. It’s like Humans of New York, but somewhat stranger. Pressure… Pressure…
48 page 6″ x 9″ black and white comic with color covers
The first in a four (or maybe five) issue series
Debuts at SPX 2014 | In stores November, 2014
ISBN: 978-1-934460-78-8
Diamond Item Code: SEP140968
 $5.99
ordering information

Get your copy from Alternative Comics and Derf at SPX 2014, 2 months before it hits stores!

smallpresspreviews:

True Stories Volume One

by Derf Backderf

published by Alternative Comics

Derf – creator of the graphic novels Trashed, Punk Rock & Trailer Parks and the international bestseller, My Friend Dahmer – presents the best of his True Stories from the long running The City comic strip, as seen in Best American Comics. It’s like Humans of New York, but somewhat stranger. Pressure… Pressure…

48 page 6″ x 9″ black and white comic with color covers

The first in a four (or maybe five) issue series

Debuts at SPX 2014 | In stores November, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-934460-78-8

Diamond Item Code: SEP140968

 $5.99

ordering information

It’s here! Derf’s True Stories #1 is a thing. Pre-order now. http://indyworld.com/creators/derf-backderf/true-stories-1/ debut at SPX. In stores November.

WTF! Someone messed with our sign!

Not too sure about this vacation spot. (at Mt. Madonna County Park)

Today the shop is being watched by this cardboard box.

Wow Cool Alternative Comics is finally on Apple’s map app.

Store doodles. Marc A. August 21 2014.

Who the he’ll did this? I must have gotten it as wrapping for some books but have no memory of it.